Services

Shoulder

Rotator Cuff Tear

About The Rotator Cuff

The rotator cuff is composed of four individual muscles known as the subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor. These muscles completely encapsulate the shoulder over an area of nearly 360 degrees. These muscles function to move the shoulder and deliver strength. These muscles are especially important for the performance of many sports, They are however, also necessary for the adequate performance of many routine activities of living such as reaching overhead or lifting or carrying items.

The Injury

Rotator cuff injury is a common shoulder problem. The rotator cuff may become injured or torn as a result of an acute injury or may also become damaged from repetitive overuse or aging. Symptoms of rotator cuff injury or tearing include shoulder pain and weakness. A rotator cuff tear can be diagnosed by MRI.

Rotator Cuff Tear

About The Rotator Cuff

The rotator cuff is composed of four individual muscles known as the subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor. These muscles completely encapsulate the shoulder over an area of nearly 360 degrees. These muscles function to move the shoulder and deliver strength. These muscles are especially important for the performance of many sports, They are however, also necessary for the adequate performance of many routine activities of living such as reaching overhead or lifting or carrying items.

The Injury

Rotator cuff injury is a common shoulder problem. The rotator cuff may become injured or torn as a result of an acute injury or may also become damaged from repetitive overuse or aging. Symptoms of rotator cuff injury or tearing include shoulder pain and weakness. A rotator cuff tear can be diagnosed by MRI.

Biceps Tendon Tear

About the Biceps Tendon

The biceps tendon can be torn from its attachment to the glenoid rim. The symptoms that result are pain and shoulder weakness.

The Injury

The biceps tendon can be torn from its attatchment to the glenoid rim, The symptoms that result are pain and shoulder weakness.

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

About The Subacromial Space

The subacromial space is a physical space that exists between the acromion and the rotator cuff. This space can be compromised by congenital deformity of the acromion and/or by degenerative changes of the acromion and acromioclavicular joint. These changes in the skeletal morphology of the acromiohumeral space result in physical damage to the rotator cuff from the bone 'impinging' on it.

The Injury

The symptoms associated with this condition cause shoulder pain, pain with overhead elevation, and pain at night with sleeping and shoulder weakness.

Acromioclavicular Separation

About the Acromioclavicular Joint

The acromioclavicular joint (ac joint) is a joint that connects the clavicle and scapula. This joint is held together by the acromioclavicular ligaments and the coracoclavicular ligaments.

The Injury

The ac joint can be injured from a direct blow to the top of the shoulder. This will typically occur as the result of a fall, often in connection with some sports related activity, which causes a disruption of the ac joint ligaments. The hallmark clinical sign of an ac separation (separated shoulder) is a deformity at the superior aspect of the shoulder. This deformity is a result of the the scapula sagging due to lost connection to the clavicle.

Acromioclavicular Arthritis

About the Acromioclavicular Joint

The acromioclavicular joint (ac joint) is a joint that connects the clavicle and scapula. This joint is prone to developing degenerative changes. These degenerative changes include degeneration and tearing of the fibrocartilaginous disc that exists within the joint, in addition to the deterioration of the joint cartilage and 'bone spurring'.

The Injury

This problem is more often seen in heavy laborers and weight lifters as a result of excessive repetitive physical stress on the joint from heavy lifting and carrying. The symptoms of this condition are shoulder pain and weakness.

Fracture

About Fracture Repair

Fractures of the shoulder include fractures of the clavicle, proximal humerus, glenoid and scapula. Many of these fractures can be adequately treated without surgical intervention. When surgical intervention is necessary these fractures can often be repaired utilizing minimally invasive techniques.

The goal of surgical treatment is to restore the normal skeletal morphology and hold the bone fragments together in a rigid fashion which will allow for rapid healing and the introduction of early motion to prevent shoulder stiffness. If the fracture significantly disrupts the humeral head or disrupts the vascularity of the head, repair is often not adviseable and a shoulder replacement is the treatment of choice.

Shoulder Arthritis

The Injury

Arthritis can affect the shoulder in the same way that it can affect the weight bearing joints such as the hip and knee. The type of arthritis may be inflammatory or degenerative. Arthritis is a condition where the cartilage surface of the joints become damaged and deteriorates over time resulting in the loss of the cushioning material between the bones.

Symptoms

Symptoms associated with this condition include shoulder pain and stiffness. At Regional Orthopedics the pain and stiffness associated with advanced arthritis can be effectively relieved with a shoulder replacement. This procedure involves resection of the deteriorated arthritic surfaces of the joint followed by the bonding of synthetic implants to these surfaces which will allow for the restoration of painless motion.

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